One at first, but he'll train others.


  1. “Still Life with Duckface #NoFilter” (2009)
    iPhone (No Filter)
    Charla Clarke

    This portrait, captured in the bathroom mirror, with the subject’s iPhone uncropped from the frame, is meant to show Clarke in a natural state. Her lips, pursed into a classic “duckface” expression, and slight cock of the head indicate that she is aware of the presentational nature of the piece. But her attire (long T-shirt over short shorts) intensifies her insistence on unadorned beauty, continuing the tradition of Frida Kahlo’s bold, unflinching self-examinations. (It is rumored that Clarke attempted this photograph using the “Amaro” and “Mayfair” filters before opting for a rawer look, but those drafts were lost when the artist needed to clear space to update her phone’s operating system.)

  2. The other reporters came back with those little white MP3 players, and big boxes of compact discs. See, Apple pre-loaded the music players—the iPods, but you knew I was talking about iPods—with music from Real Bands. But they couldn’t legally give out the iPods with MP3s unless they also purchased a copy of every CD. So everyone got two copies of each album: one on the iPod, the other on a piece of plastic. Nobody who went to the event kept the CDs, they just piled them up on a table at the office. I still have one, Simon and Garfunkel’s Bookends, because, while Apple design may be the coolest thing around, the company has always, always had shitty taste in music. (See also: U2.)
  3. Awesome Brit comedian Dave Gorman, using Facebook targeting to scare potential viewers for his new series of Modern Life is Goodish. Well worth watching online if you have access to a UK proxy…

    (via 1, 2)

  4. lnthefade:

Screen shot from a New York Times article.
Someone’s history does not always define their present. Being a “troubled” kid who once climbed over a baby gate or wrote on the walls in their house with pencils does not mean one deserves to die in a hail of bullets at the hand of a police officer. And it’s odious for anyone to imply as such, especially in a major newspaper on the day of the dead boy’s funeral.

    lnthefade:

    Screen shot from a New York Times article.

    Someone’s history does not always define their present. Being a “troubled” kid who once climbed over a baby gate or wrote on the walls in their house with pencils does not mean one deserves to die in a hail of bullets at the hand of a police officer. And it’s odious for anyone to imply as such, especially in a major newspaper on the day of the dead boy’s funeral.

  5. (via merlin)

  6. Probably the most Nineties thing I own.

    Probably the most Nineties thing I own.

  7. ☛ Reflecting on a Summer at Girls Who Code

    girlswhocode:

    Girls Who Code has also provided a way to explore the applications of computer science via curriculum and speakers. Before I entered the program, I was interested in coding but I didn’t see the practical applications of it. The exposure to many speakers, workshops and field trips have made it easier to imagine one’s self in a tech workplace.

    I’ve spoken to four Girls Who Code classes this summer, and they’ve been some of the most energetic, pumped-up, smart, passionate teenagers I’ve ever experienced.

    Even in 2014, the stereotype persists that “a computer programmer” is a scruffy white/asian male who sits in a cubicle all day with a computer never interacting with other humans. Showing these girls that it’s a real option for them is key to encouraging them and girls like them to pursue software engineering as the awesome career that it is.

    There’s lots to fix about our industry for the women who are already here, but Girls Who Code are helping excite the next generation.

  8. hackersofsv:

“You live in a city like San Francisco, New York, Chicago, Atlanta, wherever you are, there’s so much stuff you could be doing in your free time. There are all these great restaurants, there are bars, there are shows, there are art exhibits, there are hikes you could be doing, there are weird, crazy bizarre things that only exist in your city. 
The problem is, it’s really hard to find out about it. Sosh is trying to be that for you. We’re trying to gather all the best things in the city and present what you should know about what you’d want to do. 
The beauty is, this is what excited me four years ago and I’m still hand-waving excited four years later. We haven’t solved it. We’ve come a long way, one in six people aged 20 - 40 living in San Francisco is a Sosh member, and there’s still no shortage of things we can do.”
Rod Begbie | Sosh

    hackersofsv:

    “You live in a city like San Francisco, New York, Chicago, Atlanta, wherever you are, there’s so much stuff you could be doing in your free time. There are all these great restaurants, there are bars, there are shows, there are art exhibits, there are hikes you could be doing, there are weird, crazy bizarre things that only exist in your city. 

    The problem is, it’s really hard to find out about it. Sosh is trying to be that for you. We’re trying to gather all the best things in the city and present what you should know about what you’d want to do. 

    The beauty is, this is what excited me four years ago and I’m still hand-waving excited four years later. We haven’t solved it. We’ve come a long way, one in six people aged 20 - 40 living in San Francisco is a Sosh member, and there’s still no shortage of things we can do.”

    Rod BegbieSosh

  9. Henry Kelly. What a Henry Kelly.

    Henry Kelly. What a Henry Kelly.

  10. capnmariam:

    Fact: Scott Simpson (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) tells some of the best tiny stories.